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tsa tests new body scanning system in las vegas

by:Kenwei      2019-08-23
LAS VEGAS (AP)-
Federal aviation officials again tried to use the airport scanner.
This time, they did not look carefully under the traveler\'s clothes.
The traffic safety authority began testing a new, gentler body scanning system at three airports on Tuesday.
They hope this will ease concerns among critics about nearly 500 people.
There are too many body scanners at 78 airports.
\"We believe it addresses the privacy issues that have been raised,\" TSA chief John pistoller said at a press conference at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D. C. , which is the airport to test the technology
The system does not involve new machines.
Instead, it relies on new software.
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Style image revealing the outline of the traveler\'s body --
This makes it uncomfortable for many people to think that movie showers can see them with the rough outline of their underwear.
Now, there\'s only one universal Image
Like the chalk outline of the body at the crime scene.
This is how it works: Travelers pass the scanner.
They can see the computer monitor as soon as they go out.
It can show a big green \"OK\" and travelers can move on.
If they have something in their pockets, or somewhere else in the body, the outline of the body appears on the screen and the box marks the position of the object.
For example, if someone has a wallet in his front pocket, the box will appear on the hips.
Then the box will trigger a human shot. down search.
\"One thing to do this is to give the travel public greater confidence because they also see the image.
\"What they saw was exactly what security officials saw, and they could say \'Oh, yes, I forgot to take that piece of paper out of my pocket, \'said Pistor. \'\".
\"Hopefully it will provide a greater deterrent to possible terrorists, and they may realize \'Okay, they\'ll see it there.
\"If this happens and I am here, then I will be caught,\" he added . \".
On Tuesday, at a test site at McAllen International Airport in Las Vegas, TSA staff demonstrated for journalists through scanners equipped with new software.
On some people, the scanner picked up the object in their pocket.
Those who don\'t carry anything instantly move through the scanner.
Another airport where the software will also be tested is Hartsfield-
Jackson International Airport in Atlanta
If everything goes well in two months, TSA can install the software to a 250 scanner nationwide for $2. 7 million.
The extension will be limited to this as the software is only available for machines produced by one of the two companies that manufacture them.
TSA officials are making a decision to expand the software\'s ability to detect objects, as well as the efficiency it can put travelers through security checkpoints.
Critics complain that,
Body scans are invasive.
S. Civil Liberties Union\'s legislative adviser in Washington, Chris Calabrese, praised TSA for responding to passenger complaints, but said the federal government needs to do more to protect the privacy of travelers.
ACLU called for an airport Bill of Rights to protect passengers legally and ban Pat-down searches.
Ideally, TSA will continue to adjust its body scanning software until the process is no more invasive than a metal detector, Calabrese said.
\"You have to strike a balance between American dignity and privacy and security issues,\" he said . \". The U. S.
Jeff Freeman, senior vice president of the travel association, said an estimated 70% of passengers thought TSA\'s search was inefficient and frustrating.
Gradual change, he said, does not solve these problems.
\"This is not a problem with scanners and pat --He said.
\"The biggest complaint is that people don\'t want to take off their shoes.
It\'s really a long time that travelers are eager to see
Vision, the idea that a country that allows humans to land on the moon can find a way to be more customer --
We are very friendly for our safety.
At McAllen International Airport in Las Vegas, passengers are dragging their tired bodies
The machine was scanned on Tuesday without protest.
Joanne Argabrite, 66, returned to her home in West Virginia, saying she wanted to know if women were more likely to be scanned and embarrassed than men.
But she did not object to security measures.
\"I don\'t want the plane to explode because someone doesn\'t want to take pictures,\" she said . \".
_ Sagar Meghani, The Associated Press writer in Washington, contributed to the report.
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