changing how you think helps the transition from prisoner back to citizen

by:Kenwei      2019-08-27
Raymond Tillman spent most of his adolescence and early adulthood.
His last release.
After three days in therewas in 2011.
He had a lot to do when he came out.
Like the digital age.
\"When I first came home, I didn\'t know anything about technology,\" he explained . \".
\"I don\'t know how to turn on the computer, let alone email.
\"But he needs a job and he needs to be able to apply online to get a job.
A parole officer suggested that Tillman go to San Bernardino, California for a return to society initiative, a promising new project aimed at a smooth transition from criminals to citizens.
A large part of AmericaS. \'s record-
Reset prison population
Criminals, so re-
The entry center reduces these numbers by helping parole personnel get the tools they need to run in society
So they don\'t end up in jail.
The project is like a bridge connecting the world of correction and social service.
At other times in Raymond Tillman\'s life, he\'s going to screw this up, but this time --
He doesn\'t even know why.
He showed up and continued to follow up.
He attended almost every class offered by the Center: \"domestic violence.
Computer literacy. Job Readiness.
Anger Management
Substance abuse
I took them all.
\"He remembered his first computer class and looked down at the mouse on the floor.
\"Is there a mouse? What? Where?
\"I was looking around the building,\" he recalled with a smile . \".
The teacher pointed to a small black device and connected it to the computer with a rope. \"I\'m like \'Wow!
I feel like a caveman.
Andrea Mitchell said: \"Catching up with technology is one of the biggest challenges
R & D director of Re-
Entry Center of Cal State.
\"They didn\'t know anything about the 1. 1 and then they were expected to enter the labor market,\" she said.
\"Ten years ago, the center was just an idea for Mitchell.
At that time, she worked at Goodwill and saw a booming economy.
Most people except those who were previously imprisoned have jobs. She thought —
There should be a resource center
A place to help \"under one roof.
\"It took a few years before many partners realized the idea.
\"Anyone working inside knows that what really matters is when you go out,\" said Carolyn Eggleston, a professor who recently retired from San Bernardino, California, he helped Mitchell bring his ideas to the university, which is currently in charge of the redesignentry center.
\"Most people out there want to get off-go-
So we need to make plans for them.
\"The center is located in a modern, two
Located in the story building of the office park not far from downtown San Bernardino.
There are several classrooms in a long corridor, each named after a prison reformer.
The classroom was named after Alexander mcnoch, a prison reformer in the year 00 s, known as the father of parole, with a whiteboard in the classroom with instructions from five peopleParagraph composition.
Below the hall is a diagram of how thoughts relate to emotions, followed by behavior.
\"This is a place to respect others,\" Mitchell said . \" She said as we visited the center.
Really clean.
I know it sounds simple.
Why do we say that?
But these people are not used to this.
\"Around the corner, Mitchell opened a small office full of hangers. Students —
This is what we call Project participants here.
You can choose from a row of suits, ties and formal shoes.
\"Our goal is to get these people employed and to be a contributing member of society,\" Mitchell said . \" To do this, they need to dress up.
The focus of the project is on job training, but when we walk through the center, it\'s clear that it\'s not just that.
Entrance: there are welcome counters but no metal detectors or armed guards;
It\'s just a small machine that scans IDs.
The lack of security is intentional, and this is part of the open culture here.
\"We came up with a radical idea that we would treat people like we did with humans,\" Eggleston explained . \".
\"These people have finished their time.
If they are ready to let go, we are ready to let go and start a new story.
When Raymond Tillman walked into the center gate, he immediately felt the \"family environment \".
His first memory of the place was an employee asking his name.
In prison they only ask his Correctional ID number: \"you almost forgot your name because you automatically give them your number when everyone asks you this question
\"Even something as simple as calling them by their first and last names can have an impact on changing their mindset,\" said Cindy Redcross, who studied prison reform.
The entry project of the non-partisan research company MDRC.
\"No, it\'s not my identity, just like now, I\'m alone.
\"Redcross sees a lot of value in projects like this:\" It\'s not just education or job training, \"she explains. \" It\'s really changing the way people think.
\"The results of San Bernardino so far are promising.
So far, in the four centres of the county, they have served about 6,000 students.
Attendance is high, with more than half of the students now employed.
The organization and the County Corrections Department told NPR that they can\'t give us reliable data on recidivism, and of course not everyone can.
But Raymond Tillman has come a long way from his time of technical exploration. He has a full-
Time work, training to be a manager, in the process of getting a bachelor\'s degree and focusing on it.
Looking back, he could hardly believe how far he had gone.
\"I can\'t even turn on the computer when I walk into these doors,\" he said. \"Now, I\'m one of the best in the building.
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...
Thank you for your inquiry. For the many inquiries,we are too busy to contact you in time. Would you leave your contact information? Such as Email, Skype and Whatsapp.we will reply you as soon as possible. Thank you!