Sub-station

reading, writing, and intervention.

by:Kenwei      2019-09-09
Today\'s middle school and high school teachers walk into the classroom and about one out of every five students comes with a secret weapon.
This allows schools in big cities and small cities to install metal detectors, X-
Even CCTV cameras.
However, the San Antonio Independent School District is taking a more personal approach to ensure the safety of its schools ---
Very good results.
Consider these statistics: of the students who are usually found in schools to carry weapons, 55% use razor or knives, 24% use clubs, and 21% use guns.
Hispanic men are more likely to be found carrying weapons.
Black men ranked second, and white men ranked third. (1)
The school responded by force: * due to an incident at the beginning of last year, the Norfolk VA School Board became the first person in the state to approve the use of metal detectors.
A high school student was injured in an accidental gun explosion at school and authorities found a student being sawed
In the locker of a middle school student(
Washington Post, November 25, 1991. )
* In Milwaukee last spring, officials announced they had confiscated a.
357 Magnan, a saw
Shotgun and some. 38-
From the beginning of the school year, caliber pistol.
The head of the school recommended that metal detectors be installed in all schools, and school officials conduct random weapons searches. (
The Chicago Tribune, April 6, 1992. )
* Officials in Prince George County, Maryland have announced that they have found 20 guns at school since July 1991.
Officials plan to increase police and security patrols to schools. (
Washington Post, March 24, 1992. )
Back in 1980, in San Antonio, Texas, school boards and school administrators realized that their city would be an attractive target for violence and the growing popularity of drugs --
In schools in cities across the country, related activities have become a common problem.
Sam Wolff, former director of the security department of the Independent School District of San Antonio, explained that the area of such activities is ripe: \"Drug dealers in California and Florida are under great pressure from law enforcement and need to leave these states, to keep their business profitable.
San Antonio is close to the Gulf and Mexico.
The city\'s military personnel are highly concentrated because there are many bases around it.
Drug dealers see it as a key terminal for drug delivery.
This is a drug deal.
Related activities.
\"It is not drug dealers that are related to the school board, but youth gangs recruited by dealers act as couriers.
For a long time, working through youth gangs is an established practice for dealers, because if teenagers abuse drugs, they are not as easily prosecuted as adults.
Children are cheap to work.
After 38 years in the school district, Wolf retired in June, blaming the issue in part on loose court proceedings.
The justice system is like a revolving door, he explained. -
One day, in prison, the next day.
\"If the offender is caught, he or she will never have more than three to six months of circulation.
There are no precautions there.
There are no consequences.
Recent research, such as the Denver Youth Survey, supports Mr. swough\'s view.
The investigation began in the late 1980 s, targeting the arrested teenagers, what crimes they committed, and the impact of the arrest on the subsequent criminal behaviour of the teenagers. (2)
According to a researcher at lead researcher David Huizinga and research assistant finnyson, the findings suggest that the arrest has little deterrent effect on most young people.
The researchers explained, \"in the second year, a larger proportion of those arrested increased their violations to more serious forms of crime.
Part of notarization\"(3)
Huizinga and Esbensen concluded that \"in addition to good law enforcement, more attention needs to be paid to prevention strategies to successfully reduce the involvement of criminal acts. \"(4)
The researchers added that for those active criminals who have not been arrested and those who have not yet started their criminal careers, there is a need for programs to prevent criminal acts.
\"The potential importance of prevention programs is important for both the juvenile justice system and schools,\" Huizinga and Esbensen noted . \".
\"Schools can play a central role in crime prevention. \"(5)
Since 1977 police officers were commissioned by the security services, they have patrolled schools in the area.
At that time, the police were limited to patrolling.
Wolf noted that by the mid-19th century, it was clear that the school board and his department needed to control the campus from outside.
In 1986, the State Council approved the establishment of an independent police department dedicated to the school district.
Heart of San Antonio
The City School District was immediately involved in the initiative and today all 10 other school districts in the state have their own police stations.
With the assistance of the National School Safety Center at the University of peperding (
An organization that promotes safe schools and helps ensure quality education for all children)
The safety department and the school board put their energy and resources into the integrated schools
Based on the prevention plan.
The key words of the project are Intervention and Prevention.
\"Our main goal is to intervene and prevent problems from happening, not just as a law enforcement agency,\" Wolf explained.
\"The duty of the school police station is to provide a safe learning environment for all students.
Law enforcement officers--
Known as an intervention officer. -
Participate in the academic and personal life of the students.
The police have achieved this through a variety of means such as mentoring, coaching, teaching, etc. , giving students the opportunity to be good citizens and to respect others and their property.
The goal of the department is to involve officials in each grade and interact with as many students as possible.
The venue of the school is their beat, similar to the old one
Outdated police of the year.
The patrolmen and women know their students and when they need help, the students will go to them for help.
As Wolf explains, \"officers and students are friends and officers.
They become a community resource.
\"The police work in all departments of the department and are assigned to work in the school or patrol the physical grounds on the periphery.
Every high school and middle school in the school district has designated law enforcement officers.
Their daily life is completely flexible and can work with children and teachers as needed.
The officers got up.
Introduce their mission to students.
Wolf explained that at the beginning of each school year, officials held a rally outlining the rules and procedures to be implemented to ensure school safety, including regular cleaning of narcotic items.
When working alone with the student, the officer interacts with the student with the goal of instilling decision-making --
Create skills and build yourself
To avoid drugs and gangs, improve the ability of students to resist peer pressure.
Other officials deal with patrol missions and provide an external deterrent barrier for criminal activities in schools.
Their mission extends to other schools where they patrol and report incidents.
Some officials even went to primary school and participated in their study activities on a regular basis.
During these visits, officials stressed to the students the importance of working hard and staying at school.
The 72 uniformed officers of the force were fully armed and served as a deterrent to criminal acts.
Despite their official demeanor, these people let the students know that they can reach the students if they need help.
In a sense, the police are partners in the fight against crime and violence.
\"We want officers to be role models for these children who can respect and care for any of their needs,\" Wolf continued . \".
Officials Intervene in students in several ways-
Seize guns on campus, assist with investigations, provide CPR and first aid, look for escapees, and even help students prepare for school drama, and guide the student service club.
Their aim is to provide students with a soothing, visible and safe presence.
Wolf tells the story of a recent case in which a teacher was frustrated by the low student attendance and was therefore unable to keep up with the school\'s work, calling for an intervention by a campus officer.
The police officer pulled the boy aside and took out the reason why he stopped school from the boy.
He found that the boy came from a single-parent family and that his primary caregiver mother was rarely at home.
The boy finally revealed that he did not come to school because his clothes were dirty and did not know how to wash them.
The officer took the boy to the laundromat and showed him how to organize, clean and dry his clothes.
The boy\'s attendance rate increased and his grades improved, and he stayed at school.
Another department of the department is committed to reducing gang members and gang members
The violence associated with it is one of the main problems affecting the community today.
Research shows that many young people join gangs looking for friendship, identity, attention and recognition.
This is the normal way of friendship.
However, violent gangs are not normal. Dr.
James Comer, a professor of child psychiatry, explains that when children realize that they are not part of the economic and social mainstream, they no longer try to connect with teachers.
They lost confidence in the school\'s ability to educate them and their ability to receive education.
So many people quit or join gangs and continue the violence in their communities. (6)
Comer explained that schools can help prevent violence by ensuring that all children are healthy
Provide services academically and by teaching children to manage conflicts and anger. (7)
It is this type of project that Wolf\'s department provides.
The department actively seeks to maintain a link between children and adults through its gang awareness and prevention program.
The school district police department has been operating a crime prevention unit since 1989.
Undercover gang intervention officials regularly engage with the gang.
Although 75% of schools are made up of Hispanic students, Wolf notes that there are about 27 different gangs in the San Antonio District ---
Hispanic, black, British and Asian.
The focus of gang intervention officials is to get young people out of gangs, stop the violence and find alternative activities and active peer groups.
Officials are supported by community businesses and often have employers offer jobs to students trying to get rid of gangs.
Officials assigned to gang units work normally every day.
In addition, officers often work late at night to gather information through contact with gang members.
This information is shared with other officers of the department and with other police departments requesting information on community gang activities.
The school\'s police station also has a gang hotline where anonymous callers can call to report gang activity, weapons and drugs and take advice on getting out of the gang.
Gang intervention officials ensure that every gang knows the enforcement powers of the officers.
Students and parents are required to read and sign a manual of procedures at the beginning of the school year, which outlines factors such as gang activities and gang activities
The use of related utensils and clothing is not allowed in schools.
Wolff explained: \"The gang knows that we won\'t bother them if they don\'t do anything wrong.
But if they do something-
They asked to do it at school.
\"Gang intervention officials also act as liaison between gangs who use their influence to try to suppress violence between gangs.
Gang members have the officer\'s phone number, the officer\'s password so they can respond at any time, day or night.
Once an official gets word that there will be a crime
Related activities--anywhere--
He or she got together with other gang officials who went to the place to try to spread it.
In this article, only one shooting incident occurred in four years.
\"When an officer is not strict with them, how these people will get along with them is amazing,\" Wolf explains . \".
\"The intervention officials became their friends.
Really, that\'s all about this project.
\"Campus and gang intervention officers spread their anti-gang messages by introducing gang awareness to other police departments, school administrators, teachers and staff throughout the year.
Presentations were also made to professional groups, community organizations and churches.
\"We explained to the audience the factors that need attention and how to discourage children from participating in such activities,\" Wolf continued . \".
The school\'s police department also worked closely with the national Department of Juvenile probation to guide students on probation.
\"We are trying to tell the children that what they are doing today will be with them for the rest of their lives.
\"Once their behavior is on the record, it will be a difficult place to change,\" Wolf notes . \".
In terms of the use of safety equipment, Wolf admitted that while his school district had some portable metal detectors, he and his staff made it a priority to develop people\'s involvement in enhancing electronic technology.
With the strong support of school boards and teacher organizations, Wolf believes that the intervention program is the most effective effort for weapons testing in the city\'s schools.
\"Metal detectors pose a challenge for children . \"
\"If they knew they would be searched when they came to school, they would find a way to beat the system.
\"We found that the interaction between police officers and students was the best.
The children know more than the police do, because the children communicate with each other.
If there are weapons in the school, the children know where they are.
\"The Wolf continues to say that as a friend of the children, the police officer will learn about the hidden things from them.
\"Children, they are the best detectors.
\"Not every official is considered an intervention officer.
It\'s a 24-hour job. hour-a-day, seven-day-a-weekcommitment.
After all, a special person needs to get up at 3: 00 in the morning, talk to a hysterical teenager, or break the fight between rival gangs.
Wolf has set up an interview process to screen people who are not able to handle job needs.
All applicants must pass the state-
Approved Law Enforcement colleges and certified police officers.
Subsequently, Wolf and his staff conducted interviews with applicants to understand their temper in working with their children and in school settings.
The wolf will not stop there.
He interviewed the applicant\'s family to see if they were also willing to meet the requirements and schedules that these people would face.
\"If your family can\'t handle it, you can\'t handle it,\" Wolf explained . \".
Wolf looks for some key personality traits among potential officials in this type of work, including communication skills, diplomatic skills, and finally honesty.
\"I can\'t afford people who are not suitable for this project,\" he explained . \".
\"A bad cop can help them destroy their children faster than a good cop.
\"Wolf emphasizes that he depends on his officer\'s ability to be honest and committed to their work, because\" Children can read through you when you don\'t get along directly with them.
\"Then, the spending-cutting officers will be trained including handling child abuse cases, arresting power and fire training.
\"We upgrade our training every year so officers don\'t get old,\" Wolf continued . \".
\"We also send this information through the courses provided by the Law Enforcement Academy.
\"Despite rigorous screening and training, Wolf explained that he had between 200 and 300 applicants in each of the 72 officer vacancies.
Wolf attributed the popularity of the show to its uniqueness.
\"It allows the police to do something they can\'t do in other law enforcement areas.
\"Wolf stressed that he is not looking for robot police, but returning to the old generation.
Learn about the old-fashioned police of the community and the people.
Once individuals become intervention officers, they will get as much work as possible.
Additional tasks include school sports, dance, Carnival-
Anything related to the school.
\"Our officers can only work for the school district ---
\"Wolf-lighting is not allowedstresses.
\"Our officials are strict with the work of the school district.
\"Look around the country, big-
The city school system from Los Angeles to New York is investing heavily in their safety programs.
New York City, for example, has a security budget of $60 million, partly for 120 high school and nearly 1 million students in the city.
Most of the budget is for the maintenance of a force of 450 security personnel.
Earlier this year, Mayor Dinkins announced an increase of $28 million for security personnel, metal detectors and X-ray machines. (8)
By contrast, the budget for Wolf\'s security program is $3.
5 million students from 97 schools in District 64,000, anda. He explained that it was a considerable sum of money.
City School District.
\"It\'s a lot of money for our economy.
In Chicago, Miami, or even Dallas, you can\'t equate the dollar here with the dollar because our cost of living is really different.
This is a huge budget for law enforcement agencies within the education community.
But, \"Wolf stressed,\" it serves not only in this capacity.
It serves such a wide range of demand areas in this community, and its money is well spent proportionally.
\"When it comes to increasing resources for safety programs, some of the strongest support for the police department comes from the Parent Teachers Association and the teacher union.
Teachers know they can\'t deal with classroom discipline on their own, especially in the middle school stage, Wolf said.
\"They see safety as a real need for their continuing education business,\" he continued . \".
The board and director are also satisfied with the efforts of the department.
There\'s proof in the budget.
Due to the efficiency of the work of the security sector, the board has increased its staff every year.
According to Wolf, \"when the board is willing to invest taxpayers\' money, its sincerity shows ---
It\'s responsible for the dollar. -
This project.
We must believe that such programs are valuable and dynamic for the education process.
\"The focus of future resources will be on young students in the school system, kindergarten to sixth grade children.
In this article, there is no complete School District
Time allocated to primary school intervention officers.
But this will change. \"It\'s the 9-to 11-year-
\"It\'s now being recruited to do courier work for drug dealers,\" Wolf explains . \".
\"Not only that.
We have a few episodes where the kids bring cocaine, drugs, marijuana, and even pistols into the school to show --and-tell.
\"We have to solve the problems of these young children.
We have to reach out to the kids who are involved in this project today, because if we don\'t, we will fight with adead --
End the battle after 10 or 12 years. \" (1)
The New York Times reported on November 11, 1991: \"There are 20% people in high schools who find weapons . \"A13. (2)
The Denver youth survey is a child and youth development study sponsored by the Federal Office for juvenile justice and crime prevention.
It concerns boys and girls aged 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 at the beginning of the 1987 survey. (3)
David Huizinga and Finn Esbensen, eye-catching views on juvenile justice, school safety, Spring 199217 (4)
Heizjin ha andebensen page. 17. (5)
Huizinga and Esbensen, p. 17. (6)
Jane Grady, new ways to prevent violence, school safety34. (7)Grady, p. 34. (8)Robert D.
The New York Times reported on March 2, 1992: \"In the debate on school safety, the diversity of the system has maintained the enthusiasm for solutions . \"B3.
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...
Thank you for your inquiry. For the many inquiries,we are too busy to contact you in time. Would you leave your contact information? Such as Email, Skype and Whatsapp.we will reply you as soon as possible. Thank you!