Sub-station

the whitney houston rules

by:Kenwei      2019-09-07
That\'s why security guards at Keahole airport in Kona, Hawaii, landed singer Whitney Houston on the plane after discovering 15 people.
On January, she had two grams of marijuana in her bag, let them know, let us know.
It is also unclear that law enforcement in Hawaii told us that this was the final treatment of her case.
But no matter what ultimately happens in Houston, the incident points to the absurd inconsistency between American law, attitude and rhetoric about marijuana.
When APBNews reported on April 13 that Hawaii\'s prosecutors had decided not to sue Houston, because airport security officers, as private employees, had no right to detain passengers, it looked suspiciously like a rampant case of fav\'s alleged fraud.
Starstruck security gives a free pass to a celebrity caught Red
Half an ounce of marijuana.
It was not until after months of media coverage that the state prosecutor\'s office felt the need to issue a press release: last week, it said, \"it was wrongly reported that it had decided not to sue Ms. Houston.
\"Her fate now seems to depend on a P. R. -
The prosecutor\'s office made a conscious decision that she needed to be an example.
It is widely reported that on January, Houston and her husband singer Bobby Brown were passing through a security checkpoint where a guard found and seized marijuana.
Despite reports that security guards were trying to detain them, Houston and Brown left their bags behind and boarded a flight to San Francisco.
The security guard called the local police but no one was on site and took a long time-
Maybe half an hour--
Let them arrive.
When they did, the plane was taxiing on the runway.
The authorities allowed the plane to take off.
Why was Houston allowed to board the plane after finding marijuana in the bag, and why was the plane allowed to take off even if local police were called to the scene, these issues are intertwined with complex issues of jurisdiction, policy and law.
The conflicting, apparently inaccurate statements made by the Hawaiian authorities about the incident did not eliminate the confusion.
All inquiries about the safety of Keahole airport were submitted to the Department of Transport\'s public affairs officer, Marilyn Cali, who said Houston was passing through metal detectors, \"when the agriculture inspector saw something organic in the bag, he asked for a further search. . .
Because you can\'t bring produce to the mainland from Hawaii.
They asked to look at her wallet and she gave it to them and left.
Kali said the security department then called the police, but \"the nearest police officer was about half an hour away,\" and the plane was already taxiing when they arrived.
When asked why they didn\'t delay the plane in order to wait for the police to arrive, Cali replied, \"I don\'t know.
After a pause, she boldly guessed: because \"they know who that person is,\" Kali also said that the security guards who found drugs were not hired by the state,, aloha Airlines and United airlines do not have the power to detain passengers: \"They are just screening them there.
Kali said: \"If they find something, then there is another security force that can detain them if necessary.
Although the police have been summoned, the security forces \"are aware of this, but I don\'t know why they chose not to detain her \".
The Hawaii County police news officer, Buck Donham, gave a slightly different statement about what happened.
According to Donham, Houston is X-after a metal detector-
The machine found an unidentified item in her bag.
Security personnel (
Not an agricultural inspector)
Asked if they could search the bag and find the marijuana.
Houston then left the bag behind and boarded her plane.
Donham said the guards were employed by the state (
(Give them the power to catch drugs, call the police)
And confirmed that no police were present at the airport.
Donham said the plane was not detained after the police arrived because there were 15 people.
2 grams of marijuana \"constitutes a minor offence only\" with a maximum fine of $1,000 and/or a maximum sentence of 30 days.
Small differences in their accounts (
Kali seems to have made a mistake saying that the guards are conducting agricultural inspections and Donham claims they are employed by the state)
The incident was largely explained by two officials who said security guards who found marijuana had no right to detain her, let alone arrest her, rather than just Logistics (
The fact that the police are not on site)
Arrest her.
Actually, they said she fell out of the crack. -
Implicitly think that the same thing could happen to anyone. Allen St.
Pierre, executive director, National cannabis law reform organization Foundation (NORML)
Scoffed at Houston\'s typical treatment.
If this is a knot
A typical marijuana user, the first guy to face a faceless face.
Time criminal, 20 years old, same happens in Hawaii, he will be arrested and he will be searched. Pierre said.
\"They will issue bonds.
He needs a lawyer.
Then, of course, he must agree to come back for the hearing.
\"Also, according to St.
Pierre, who is trying to escape airport security, usually faces a secondary or tertiary charge. [Houston]
All this was avoided.
\"While it is difficult for him to believe that there is no police at the scene, says Todd Edger, a senior felony trial attorney at Honolulu\'s public defense attorney\'s office, he believes that security personnel may not have the right to arrest a passenger carrying contraband.
But, he added, \"people would think they would have some guidelines to deal with the situation before the police arrived \".
\"I tell you,\" Eddins said thoughtfully, \"if she does this in Honolulu, she will be caught right away because there are police everywhere. . .
I guess she won\'t get on the plane.
\"Joseph McNamara, a Hoover Institute researcher and San Jose retired police chief, has spoken bluntly against the US drug policy, and I am skeptical that security guards do not have the right to detain Houston and that there is no police claim.
\"The Supreme Court has ruled that when you pass airport security, you do not have the privacy rights of the Fourth Amendment, and you have waived those rights for the safety of the airline,\" McNamara said . \".
\"Security personnel cannot be arrested.
They do not have the status of a peace officer who is an employee of civil aviation.
They informed the police.
Every major airport in the United StatesS.
A lot of police were there.
McNamara said it was hard for him to believe there was no police at the Kona airport.
\"A few years ago, police in Hawaii were criticized for being too keen to track and monitor criminals and force them to re-board.
Hawaii is one of the most tightly controlled states.
In the Houston case, McNamara said, \"What happened again and again in the drug war is that the treatment of big men is different from that of others.
Normally you are subject to a mandatory sentence.
This has been going on with members of Congress and relatives of senators, where rules that are mandatory for others do not seem to apply.
It happened to a black kid in the city center who lived in prison.
If McNamara and St.
Pierre is right, and if this typical cannabis user gets stuck in Houston, they won\'t benefit from the same legal dispute --
Getting the charming singer to board the plane\'s room makes it difficult not to draw the conclusion that celebrities prefer. But even if St.
The Houston case, Pierre was wrong. -
Our reaction to it-
Reveals the blatant double standard of American marijuana.
Houston has not been punished at all so far because he has been charged with malicious counter-attacks
Marijuana states like Texas are likely to put her in jail.
Of course, everyone knows that cannabis laws vary from state to City.
But this inconsistency is a mockery of the federal government\'s statement on drugs.
The disconnect between pious official preaching of marijuana and extremely uneven enforcement of the law is something nobody likes to talk about, but it\'s a scandal.
With thousands of people suffering in prisons and prisons across the United States, serving sentences just because they hold marijuana, it offends the feeling of fairness, because others are slapped and let go, or not punished at all.
The United States either puts money in a difficult place --
The mouth that talks is marijuana, or the mouth where the money is.
Until the state implements a fairer, more unified criminal policy on marijuana, whether it\'s as harsh as Texas, or as lax as the San Francisco Bay area, when people like Whitney Houston walk, we will continue to get irritated. -
When they don\'t, they get angry for different reasons.
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...
Thank you for your inquiry. For the many inquiries,we are too busy to contact you in time. Would you leave your contact information? Such as Email, Skype and Whatsapp.we will reply you as soon as possible. Thank you!